The Audiophile Man Featuring Hi-Fi and Music news, reviews, features and interviews 2019-04-19T16:10:49Z https://theaudiophileman.com/feed/atom/ Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[Ripped & Torn: Punk In the Raw]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=31117 2019-04-19T16:10:49Z 2019-04-19T15:37:13Z Author: Tony Drayton Publisher: Ecstatic Peace Library Pages: 326 Price: £25 Spanning 326 pages, this book…isn’t. At least, not in the classic sense. It’s more of a bound compilation from the original punk fanzine of the same name. That is, every page of the 17 issue run from October 1976 to March 1979. Because of that, the tome serves three distinct purposes. Firstly, and possibly most importantly, it provides a general social history overview of the times, the places and the environment across the published period but also an overview of punk fashion, language and politics. It also helps to convey an emotional sense of the big one, attitude. This series of DIY fanzines may have looked amateurish, like much of its competition (it was, by default), scrappy (yes) and naive (indeed) but it also tried to make the reader aware of what was going on around them. Very important that. It tried to wake up its readers to the exploitative nature of business and politicians, “The Enemies of Liberation shackle your imagination in gloomy colours of doubt, taste, uncertainty, stifle your individuality with restricted choice…and lock up your freedom in their rule books and non-information centres,” railed the text […]

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Author: Tony Drayton

Publisher: Ecstatic Peace Library

Pages: 326

Price: £25

Spanning 326 pages, this book…isn’t. At least, not in the classic sense. It’s more of a bound compilation from the original punk fanzine of the same name. That is, every page of the 17 issue run from October 1976 to March 1979.

Because of that, the tome serves three distinct purposes. Firstly, and possibly most importantly, it provides a general social history overview of the times, the places and the environment across the published period but also an overview of punk fashion, language and politics. It also helps to convey an emotional sense of the big one, attitude.

Ripped & Torn: Punk In the Raw

This series of DIY fanzines may have looked amateurish, like much of its competition (it was, by default), scrappy (yes) and naive (indeed) but it also tried to make the reader aware of what was going on around them. Very important that. It tried to wake up its readers to the exploitative nature of business and politicians, “The Enemies of Liberation shackle your imagination in gloomy colours of doubt, taste, uncertainty, stifle your individuality with restricted choice…and lock up your freedom in their rule books and non-information centres,” railed the text from Issue 16.

This reflection of social frustration was as much to do with the origins of punk as its reaction to established and, in punk’s view, bloated studio bands. 

Ripped & Torn: Punk In the Raw

Buzzcocks – lukewarm review

Secondly, this collection does what other primary documents do wonderfully – it removes any sense of hindsight while providing opinion, not from professional journalists immersed in the music scene and surrounded by contemporaries who suppled bias and influence but from music fans on the street. 

Ripped & Torn: Punk In the Raw

Blondie – well…

So the debut album from The Buzzcocks was given a lukewarm review as was Plastic Letters, Blondie’s second album. While the classic Blondie album, Parallel Lines was given short shrift. Despite offering music that was, in parts, “quite good”, the magazine pointed an accusing sell-out finger at the band, comparing Debbie Harry to a “clean and refined Linda Ronstadt surrogate”. Speaking as a Blondie fan myself, I winced at the harshness of these lines but I can’t complain as Ripped & Torn dismissed the band as, “…not being punk related anymore…” The wonderful Heart of Glass would have been Exhibit A, I suppose. 

Which was fair enough. It was good to see hard critique, unadorned and unfettered by retrospective warming nostalgia. 

Ripped & Torn: Punk In the Raw

One in the eye for Siouxsie Sioux

Inarticulate as those fans often were, you could accuse them of lacking grammatical skills and also of being ignorant to the finer elements of composition but there was a directness, energy and inherent flair in what they said and how they said it. 

There may be no hindsight in this book but there’s plenty of insight. For example, the perils of being in a punk band, especially in the early days, could be bad for your health as an interview with lead singer of Siouxsie and the Banshees, Siouxsie Sioux plus bassist, Steve Severin showed. The interviewer noted Sioux’s use of an eye-patch, worn because she was suffering from conjunctivitis and contracted via, “Gob. I think! When we were up north we were just getting showered in it. Joe Strummer got hepatitis when somebody gobbed in his mouth. You never know what you’re going to get (so if you trendy punks must gob, make sure you have approval from your doctor).”

Ripped & Torn: Punk In the Raw

Siouxsie and the Banshees – happy not to be Joe Strummer

Thirdly, it showed what was possible if you put your mind to it. That you didn’t have to have professional printing/publishing equipment to make a point and that the very nature of the minimalist production was art in itself. 

Drayton (then aged 18) started the magazine in Cumbernauld a town just outside Glasgow. He took a week to write Issue 1 and another week to sneakily photocopy the pages at work. Later issues were created in a squat in London. The book features an introduction and a measure of context from Drayton and is also largely untouched and unaltered from that point onwards. It isn’t even bothered by page numbers. Very punk.

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[110LP v2 Phono Amplifier From Moon]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=31089 2019-04-19T15:13:11Z 2019-04-19T14:23:26Z Compact and dinky it might be but Moon says that this little phono amplifier can punch above its weight (and size). Paul Rigby reviews the 110LP v2 Allow me to throw you a few stats to give you an idea of what you’re dealing with here. This is a little box spanning 127 x 42 x 165mm and weighing in at around 1.5kg. So this little phono amplifier is just the thing if you’re short on space. It’s also demure and shy in its general appearance. This low profile look will again appeal to many who don’t like their hi-fi to parade in front of them. Some hi-fi kit does a veritable calypso while wearing head feathers and a rainbow skirt. Not the 110. Low key. Low vis. Low height. Thats the Moon 110LP v2. When you are matching your cartridge with this phono amplifier, you’ll be faced with banks of DIP switches underneath (see image below). Now look, I’ll tell you straight that I dislike DIP switches intensely. They are finicky, confusing and easy to configure incorrectly. That said, you are given a nice little pen-type piece of plastic called a DIPStick from Grayhill which assists with the switch […]

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Compact and dinky it might be but Moon says that this little phono amplifier can punch above its weight (and size). Paul Rigby reviews the 110LP v2

Allow me to throw you a few stats to give you an idea of what you’re dealing with here. This is a little box spanning 127 x 42 x 165mm and weighing in at around 1.5kg. So this little phono amplifier is just the thing if you’re short on space. It’s also demure and shy in its general appearance. This low profile look will again appeal to many who don’t like their hi-fi to parade in front of them. Some hi-fi kit does a veritable calypso while wearing head feathers and a rainbow skirt. Not the 110. Low key. Low vis. Low height. Thats the Moon 110LP v2.

110 Phono Amplifier From Moon

When you are matching your cartridge with this phono amplifier, you’ll be faced with banks of DIP switches underneath (see image below). Now look, I’ll tell you straight that I dislike DIP switches intensely. They are finicky, confusing and easy to configure incorrectly. That said, you are given a nice little pen-type piece of plastic called a DIPStick from Grayhill which assists with the switch moving and, in sonic terms at this price, DIP switching is best system available. Other solutions will either degrade the sound performance or demand a dramatic price hike. So, like me, you’re lumbered. The settings themselves are not too puzzling, to be honest but I found that I wasn’t sure – at least initially – where the switch was. The well lit image below, oddly enough, looks rather clearer than real life. Maybe when shadows loom in those recessed DIP switch pits then… That is, at first glance, it was tough to know where a switch was sitting: on the left or right. I got the hang of that pretty soon but I can imagine someone pushing to breaking point a DIP switch to the right which is already to the right because it looks like its on the left! Phew! If you catch my drift. Just don’t push too hard, the switches are not hard to move. If you’re pushing a switch to the right and it just won’t shift, it’s probably already there.

Those settings include impedance (i.e. 47kΩ, 475Ω,100Ω, 10Ω), capacitance loading (i.e. 0pF, 100pF,330pF, 430pF), gain (40dB, 50dB, 54dB, 60dB, 66dB) and a user selectable curve (IEC/RIAA).

110 Phono Amplifier From Moon

The wall wart-powered aluminium chassis includes four-layer PCB tracings using pure copper and inductive DC filtering. It also features a socket for the 24V switch mode power supply, arrives in any colour you want as long as its black and comes with a 10-year warranty. 

SOUND QUALITY

I began with a vinyl version of Nancy Wilson’s You’ve Got Your Troubles from the original Capitol/EMI pressing of A Touch of Today (1966). This album features a measure of compression so, while there’s plenty of detail on offer, the upper mids are pushed to the edge. This means that any hi-fi product that’s not perfectly neutral will push this recording into the bright zone and you’ll know about it pretty pronto.

As for the 110LP v2 in action? This box is as neutral as I’ve heard in a while from a relatively low cost phono amp. There was no hint of the 110 forcing the issue within the upper mid or treble zones. Instead, the Moon took its foot off the pedal and let the music do its thing. 

Upper mids were not only balanced in terms of presentation, the low noise from the unit meant that the midrange was able to rope in more detail than I would have expected at this price point.

110 Phono Amplifier From Moon

What I mean is that the reduction in noise increased the 3D effect of the soundstage so the music seemed to push backwards towards the rear wall of my listening room. As the soundstage moved backwards, the new space wasn’t just heard as an empty void, of course, it was filled by new detail. So, on one channel, a quite frantic acoustic guitar strum added finesse and delicacy to the sound of the strings. With some phono amps, that acoustic guitar could sound restricted and a little forced. 

Let me elaborate. Imagine standing in a room, looking through a window and seeing a face on the other side squashed against the glass. Now, as you stare in horror and before you reach for your phone to call the Police, observe that face. Apart from the bent nose, the cheeks are flattened, the eyes look a little scary and the lips will be distorted. That’s the equivalent effect that some phono amps can produce if all they offer is a flat 2D soundstage.

110 Phono Amplifier From Moon

The 110LP v2 gives, in effect, more room for details to manifest themselves. So, you’re back in your room with this odd looking person on the other side of the glass? Imagine that they slowly move backwards, the lips detach from the glass, the nose unbends, the eyes blink and the face slowly emerges, offers form, structure, new depth, more detail can be seen, new subtle aspects of the cheek bones are visible for the first time and, hey, they actually look quite attractive. I wonder if they’re free for dinner tonight…?

But enough shenanigans. Do you see how a 3D soundstage is actually important when appreciating delicate details?

110 Phono Amplifier From Moon

I changed the music to a more dynamic and bass heavy master from rock outfit T2 and It’ll All Work Out in Boomland and the track, Morning. Again, the result was a balanced output with bass offering a wealth of information, transient detail, reverb response and more but doing it within the confines of the mix without booming and dominating or affecting the midrange. During the early part of this track I was impressed, during a high energy, rather noisy part of the sound, how the drums were kicking up a storm, the guitar was a beast of noise and yet the delicate cymbal taps were clearly evident with enough space in and around to offer their own reverb tails. The sense of order and discipline was high yet the naturalistic flow of the music was also important here. The detail on offer never appeared forced or false and plastic in any way. 

CONCLUSION

The best compliment I can offer the Moon 110LP v2 is that I often found my attention drifting away from the review in hand and becoming lost in the music. Which is why this review took twice as long as it should have. Ten minutes would go by and then I’d suddenly click back into work mode, realising that I should be making notes at this point. The 110 is thus an involving piece of kit and one that integrates easily and efficiently into any balanced hi-fi system. Tonally, it is very impressive indeed with an organic clarity that is mightily impressive at this price point. 

If you’re building a top-end budget analogue system and have a To Do shopping list? You don’t have to look to the heavens for guidance on the phono amplifier selection, just the Moon.


MOON 110 PHONO AMPLIFIER

Price: £399

Tel: 0131 555 3922

Website: www.simaudio.com

GOOD: tonal balance, neutral presentation, midrange clarity, disciplined bass, value for money

BAD: nothing

RATING: 9


Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

REFERENCE

Pro-Ject RPM3 turntable

Trichord Dino phono amplifier

Rega Brio-R amplifier

Spendor A1 speakers

Black Rhodium cables

Blue Horizon Professional Rack System

Harmonic Resolution Systems Noise Reduction Components

All vinyl was cleaned using an Audio Desk’s Ultrasonic Pro Vinyl Cleaner 

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[Hana ML Low Output Cartridge]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=31071 2019-04-19T11:25:54Z 2019-04-19T11:07:23Z Hana’s range of cartridges continues to grow slowly yet steadily. New up? Paul Rigby reviews the ML moving coil complete with a MicroLine stylus ‘Brilliant and Gorgeous’. That’s what Hana means in Japanese, apparently. I’ll leave you to consider the latter but the brand has certainly lived up the the former over recent months and years. I’ve come across a few of the company’s cartridges and have been startled at the high level of sound quality. Not to mention value for money.  This new model arrives at a few pounds under a £1,000 so the build quality and potential sound performance is on the rise, methinks. I was eager to find out if the company might falter in performance terms this time or retain its steady progress. There are two models in this mini range of ‘M’ cartridges, one is high output (i.e. the MH) but I plumped for the ML, a low output moving coil cartridge, complete with a MicroLine stylus profile. That’s where the ‘M’ bit of name comes into play. The chassis is made from black polyoxymethylene (POM). The parent company,  Excel uses a particular formulation of POM manufactured by DuPont that sells under the trademarked name […]

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Hana’s range of cartridges continues to grow slowly yet steadily. New up? Paul Rigby reviews the ML moving coil complete with a MicroLine stylus

Brilliant and Gorgeous’. That’s what Hana means in Japanese, apparently. I’ll leave you to consider the latter but the brand has certainly lived up the the former over recent months and years. I’ve come across a few of the company’s cartridges and have been startled at the high level of sound quality. Not to mention value for money. 

This new model arrives at a few pounds under a £1,000 so the build quality and potential sound performance is on the rise, methinks. I was eager to find out if the company might falter in performance terms this time or retain its steady progress.

There are two models in this mini range of ‘M’ cartridges, one is high output (i.e. the MH) but I plumped for the ML, a low output moving coil cartridge, complete with a MicroLine stylus profile. That’s where the ‘M’ bit of name comes into play.

Hana ML Low Output Cartridge

The chassis is made from black polyoxymethylene (POM). The parent company,  Excel uses a particular formulation of POM manufactured by DuPont that sells under the trademarked name Delrin, a material you may have heard of before. I’ve seen it used in turntable platters, for example (I came across it last when I reviewed the STST Motus II turntable)

The front yoke, center and rear components of the magnetic electro-motive circuit and wires are Cryogenic processed, while high-quality copper wire has been selected for the moving coils.

There are captive threaded nuts for head shell fixing screws, built into the cartridge body which is a blessing because I hate installing cartridges while juggling screws and their attendant screw-nuts and the cartridge body. 

Hana ML Low Output Cartridge

Oh, and you may have noticed the gold coloured area at the top of the chassis? That’s a gold plated copper resonance plate that is integral with the cartridge body. It’s there to reduce vibration.

You can hear more about the background to the design via this show report interview I did at the Bristol 2019 show. I chatted with Hiroshi Ishihara of Youtek Ltd. Japan, the Marketing and World Sales Manager for the Hana brand.

SOUND QUALITY

I began with an original pressing from the great Ethel Ennis and This is Ethel Ennis (RCA) from 1964. Ennis offered a smooth, cultured, romantic delivery and here she was fronting a full orchestra with jazz overtones but also sweeping strings. I played He Loves Me which offered a playful and energetic gently jazz-based orchestral score.

Hana ML Low Output Cartridge

Playing this record with the Hana ML struck a chord, as it where and it directed me to the very top of the dynamic range. The reach of this cartridge was high indeed which meant that there was a tremendous sense of space. I’ve heard this signature before from Japanese designs. Is it a cultural thing, I wonder? A sort of reaction against the busy and packed cities in that country in which everything and everyone sits cheek by jowl with their neighbour? Do their hi-fi designers exhibit a yearning for space by infusing their cartridges with the stuff? The ML certainly provided it, at any rate, especially around the treble section which not only allowed the cymbals to provide a beautiful sense of character and form – you could hear the nature of this big piece of flat metal when it was hit – but also the reverb that emerged from the hit itself. That decay was long and fragile which lifted the entire song upwards, giving the music a sense of lightness. 

Hana ML Low Output Cartridge

The upper mids, occupied by much of the brass and wind section, was precise in approach. The sense of focus in this area added to the instrument’s personality. Sometimes, during loud crescendos, it was transcribed a little aggressively but that’s me being ultra-picky, that effect was down to price point and not the inherent design. For a sub-£1,000 design, the ML provided a sublime transcription of both the brass and strings. The latter flowed without effort while the brass, especially when the sax and trombones hit lower frequencies during the later parts of the song, showed a wonderful resonance that reverberated with a reedy character.

Midrange insight was superb too. Early in this song, on the right channel, was a piano. Really though this guy sounded like he was playing in another room and you could only make out he was there at all because the studio door was open and the sound was travelling down the corridor. Subtle, that’s what it was. Yet the ML picked up this effect and did so with a mite more character and detail than many more expensive moving coils I’ve heard of late. 

This ability of the ML to lower noise, reach deep into the mix and extract subtle effects naturally without having to force the detail out by pinching the upper frequencies, for example, was one of the major talents of its basic design. 

I wondered how it might react with more dynamic fare so reached for T2 and It’ll All Work Out in Boomland a slice of early prog rock with varying time signatures and tempos from the track In Circles.

It’s very easy for a cartridge to take this raucous piece of high-energy rock, panic and then present the lot to you as a lump of noise. I’ve heard it done before on numerous occasions. The ML was different. What hit me was the instrumental separation and the calm way that the cartridge applied itself to music. 

Hana ML Low Output Cartridge

Hence, I could quite easily hear the lead guitar and drums – they were almost a given in this powerful track. What was noticeable was how the cymbal taps were separated from this vigorous piece of music and how easy it was for the ear to track the taps throughout the entire track. 

Oddly enough, though, the major achievement here was the emergence of the bass guitar. The latter which is normally subsumed underneath the maelstrom, becoming a series of low-end tones. Here, though, you could plainly hear the bass guitarist noodling away to himself in the rear of the mix. Having a fine time he was too. You’d never know that fact from some cartridges out there though. 

CONCLUSION

Hana has a growing reputation for quality of design. No matter what price point it decides to tackle, it tends to provide a value for money product because it tends to give you more than the competition at that particular point. For the ML that meant a sense of clarity and insight that allowed detail to be picked out from the subtle recesses of the mix. A trick often reserved for rarified high-end designs. That’s the quality of the Hana ML. 


HANA ML MOVING COIL CARTRIDGE

Price: £995

[NOTE: All Hana cartridges requiring a replacement stylus due to wear or customer damage will be swapped for a brand new identical cartridge at 80% the current retail price less UK carriage costs.] 

Web: www.airaudio.co.uk

Tel: 01491 629629


GOOD: midrange insight, dynamic reach, instrumental separation, tonal balance

BAD: nothing

RATING: 9


[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

REFERENCE

Origin Live Sovereign turntable

Origin Live Enterprise 12″ arm

Van Den Hul Crimson XGW Stradivarius Cartridge

Soundsmith Paua Mk.II cartridge

van den Hul MC One Special

Icon PS3 phono amplifier

Aesthetix Calypso pre-amp

Icon Audio MB845 Mk.II monoblock amplifiers

Quad ESL-57 speakers with One Thing upgrade

Tellurium Q Statement cables

Gekko Purple Haze cables

Studio Connections Cables

Blue Horizon Professional Rack System

Harmonic Resolution Systems Noise Reduction Components

CAD GC1 Ground Controls

All vinyl was cleaned using an Audio Desk’s Ultrasonic Pro Vinyl Cleaner

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[Planar 78 Turntable From Rega]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=31051 2019-04-19T09:45:30Z 2019-04-19T09:29:58Z A dedicated, single speed turntable that runs only at 78RPM, the design uses a 24V motor and arrives fitted with a RB220 tonearm A minimalist, dedicated and because of that, no doubt audiophile approach to 78rpm discs, the Rega Planar 78 uses the RB220 tonearm which is in itself an evolution of the RB250. That was supplied as standard on early Planar 2 and P2 turntables. The tonearm uses a lightweight polymer bearing.  The tonearm also features a die-cast tube and the three point fixing technique based on the mounting design system.  The platter for the turntable is manufactured from phenolic resin while 78 fans should look out for Rega’s dedicated 78 moving magnet cartridge, the RB78 (sold separately). Price of the Planar 78 is £299. To read more, click www.rega.co.uk [Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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A dedicated, single speed turntable that runs only at 78RPM, the design uses a 24V motor and arrives fitted with a RB220 tonearm

Planar 78 Turntable From Rega

A minimalist, dedicated and because of that, no doubt audiophile approach to 78rpm discs, the Rega Planar 78 uses the RB220 tonearm which is in itself an evolution of the RB250. That was supplied as standard on early Planar 2 and P2 turntables.

The tonearm uses a lightweight polymer bearing. 

Planar 78 Turntable From Rega

The tonearm also features a die-cast tube and the three point fixing technique based on the mounting design system. 

The platter for the turntable is manufactured from phenolic resin while 78 fans should look out for Rega’s dedicated 78 moving magnet cartridge, the RB78 (sold separately). Price of the Planar 78 is £299.

To read more, click www.rega.co.uk

[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[EVO 100 Integrated From Primaluna]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=31035 2019-04-19T09:45:59Z 2019-04-18T16:40:37Z It has been nearly a decade since PrimaLuna has introduced an entirely refreshed product line. The new EvoLution series – including this EVO 100 – shares the previous line’s DNA, featuring upgraded transformers and internal components, “improved aesthetics” (i.e. rounded faceplate edges, roll-top tube cages on all models and more) and headphone amplifiers on all integrated amplifiers with, “…true-balanced, transformer-coupled XLR inputs and outputs on upper-end models,” said the company What remains is point-to-point wiring and cutting-edge Adaptive Auto-Bias circuitry. So, if a valve fails, Adaptive AutoBias will instantly put the amplifier into protection mode so no parts can get damaged. A red LED will light up in front of the tube that needs replacing. (ProLogue Classic illuminates an LED on the front panel.) You just need to plug in another valve and you’re off and running. A toroidal power transformers is used within this model, “Compared to standard transformers,” said the company, “toroids radiate about a tenth of the magnetic field that pollutes music and obscures detail. Additionally, the absence of an air gap typically means toroids have an 8:1 reduction of acoustic noise.” All PrimaLuna products use large, potted toroidal transformers, enclosed in a metal housing and then potted in a […]

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It has been nearly a decade since PrimaLuna has introduced an entirely refreshed product line. The new EvoLution series – including this EVO 100 – shares the previous line’s DNA, featuring upgraded transformers and internal components, “improved aesthetics” (i.e. rounded faceplate edges, roll-top tube cages on all models and more) and headphone amplifiers on all integrated amplifiers with, “…true-balanced, transformer-coupled XLR inputs and outputs on upper-end models,” said the company

EVO 100 Integrated From Primaluna

What remains is point-to-point wiring and cutting-edge Adaptive Auto-Bias circuitry. So, if a valve fails, Adaptive AutoBias will instantly put the amplifier into protection mode so no parts can get damaged. A red LED will light up in front of the tube that needs replacing. (ProLogue Classic illuminates an LED on the front panel.) You just need to plug in another valve and you’re off and running.

EVO 100 Integrated From Primaluna

A toroidal power transformers is used within this model, “Compared to standard transformers,” said the company, “toroids radiate about a tenth of the magnetic field that pollutes music and obscures detail. Additionally, the absence of an air gap typically means toroids have an 8:1 reduction of acoustic noise.”

EVO 100 Integrated From Primaluna

All PrimaLuna products use large, potted toroidal transformers, enclosed in a metal housing and then potted in a non-microphonic resin to further reduce noise and to protect the windings from moisture and deterioration.

EVO 100 Integrated From Primaluna

The 40W EVO 100 amplifier uses two 12AX7, two 12AU7 and four EL34 valves, spans 279 x 190 x 404mm and weighs in at 18kg. Price is $2,299.

Integrated Amp From Primaluna

To see more, click www.primaluna-usa.com

[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[K1 Bluetooth speaker From Kew Labs]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=31028 2019-04-19T09:46:24Z 2019-04-18T14:30:32Z Kew Labs has announced the K1 portable speaker, featuring a 10W dual driver. The K1 range of pill shaped portable speakers are available in a range of colours including metallic silver and gunmetal grey, red and yellow. They feature rubber inlay buttons which gives a clue to their IPX4 water resistant standard. The K1 features a 2,600mAh battery for 8-12 hours of play time. An auto turn off feature aids battery life and the LED lights signal when the speaker is fully charged. The Bluetooth 4.2 speaker also has a 10m range and a 3.5mm jack for wired connectivity. Hands-free calling is included along with a conferencing function while an omni-directional mic supports calls as well as Apple Siri and Google Now voice commands. Price is £41. For more information, click www.kewlabstech.com [Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Kew Labs has announced the K1 portable speaker, featuring a 10W dual driver. The K1 range of pill shaped portable speakers are available in a range of colours including metallic silver and gunmetal grey, red and yellow. They feature rubber inlay buttons which gives a clue to their IPX4 water resistant standard.

K1 Bluetooth speaker From Kew Labs

The K1 features a 2,600mAh battery for 8-12 hours of play time. An auto turn off feature aids battery life and the LED lights signal when the speaker is fully charged. The Bluetooth 4.2 speaker also has a 10m range and a 3.5mm jack for wired connectivity.

K1 Bluetooth speaker From Kew Labs

Hands-free calling is included along with a conferencing function while an omni-directional mic supports calls as well as Apple Siri and Google Now voice commands. Price is £41.

K1 Bluetooth speaker From Kew Labs

For more information, click www.kewlabstech.com

[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[Mo portable speaker From POW Audio]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=31017 2019-04-19T09:47:07Z 2019-04-18T13:50:52Z Massachusetts-based POW Audio has announced Mo, its new portable speaker, complete with WaveBloom technology. Weighing in at under 200g, the portable Bluetooth-equipped speaker includes a patented technique to expand its housing, creating a passive radiator The pocket-sized speaker also features a magnetic base, meaning that you can attach it to the likes of a fridge, filing cabinet or other suitable metal surface. The Mo price also includes an adhesive click mount, which can be attached to your smartphone. POW even bundles a magnetic wallet attachment for storing a couple of bank cards and some notes. A two-hour charge lasts for eight hours or more while the Bluetooth range maxes out at 30m. Mo’s injection moulded body is equipped with a perforated steel sheet grille, comes in two colours, snow or graphite and is water resistant and UV-stable. It is possible to pair two Mo speakers for stereo play. Out in late April for “around” £100. To learn more visit www.powaudio.com [Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Massachusetts-based POW Audio has announced Mo, its new portable speaker, complete with WaveBloom technology. Weighing in at under 200g, the portable Bluetooth-equipped speaker includes a patented technique to expand its housing, creating a passive radiator

Mo portable speaker From POW Audio

The pocket-sized speaker also features a magnetic base, meaning that you can attach it to the likes of a fridge, filing cabinet or other suitable metal surface. The Mo price also includes an adhesive click mount, which can be attached to your smartphone. POW even bundles a magnetic wallet attachment for storing a couple of bank cards and some notes.

Mo portable speaker From POW Audio

A two-hour charge lasts for eight hours or more while the Bluetooth range maxes out at 30m.

Mo portable speaker From POW Audio

Mo’s injection moulded body is equipped with a perforated steel sheet grille, comes in two colours, snow or graphite and is water resistant and UV-stable.

Mo portable speaker From POW Audio

It is possible to pair two Mo speakers for stereo play. Out in late April for “around” £100.

Portable speaker From POW Audio

To learn more visit www.powaudio.com

[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[6000N Play Streamer From Audiolab]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=30999 2019-04-19T09:47:38Z 2019-04-16T17:20:25Z The 6000N Play is a network audio player with wireless streaming facilities and a dual-band, dual-antenna Wi-Fi The 6000N Play connects wirelessly with other Play-Fi-equipped devices and Internet music services such as Spotify, Tidal, HDtracks, Deezer, Qobuz, Amazon Music, Napster, TuneIn, iHeartRadio and SiriusXM and thousands of Internet radio stations and podcasts. You can also stream from a home media server with DLNA compatibility.  The 6000N Play is hi-res audio enabled, capable of receiving data up to 24bit/192kHz resolution over Wi-Fi without transcoding or down sampling. The featured DAC is an ES9018 Sabre32 Reference chip. ESS Technology’s 32bit HyperStream architecture and Time Domain Jitter Eliminator is also coupled to Audiolab’s own circuitry, helped by an isolated power supply with a toroidal transformer. The 6000N Play is configured and operated via the Play-Fi app, available for iOS, Android and Kindle Fire phones and tablets, as well as Apple and Android smartwatches and Windows PCs. It can also stream directly from Spotify via Spotify Connect and is DLNA and UPnP compliant.  The Audiolab 6000N Play network audio streamer is available from May in a choice of black or silver, at £449.95. To learn more, click www.audiolab.co.uk [Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: […]

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The 6000N Play is a network audio player with wireless streaming facilities and a dual-band, dual-antenna Wi-Fi

The 6000N Play connects wirelessly with other Play-Fi-equipped devices and Internet music services such as Spotify, Tidal, HDtracks, Deezer, Qobuz, Amazon Music, Napster, TuneIn, iHeartRadio and SiriusXM and thousands of Internet radio stations and podcasts.

You can also stream from a home media server with DLNA compatibility. 

The 6000N Play is hi-res audio enabled, capable of receiving data up to 24bit/192kHz resolution over Wi-Fi without transcoding or down sampling.

The featured DAC is an ES9018 Sabre32 Reference chip. ESS Technology’s 32bit HyperStream architecture and Time Domain Jitter Eliminator is also coupled to Audiolab’s own circuitry, helped by an isolated power supply with a toroidal transformer.

The 6000N Play is configured and operated via the Play-Fi app, available for iOS, Android and Kindle Fire phones and tablets, as well as Apple and Android smartwatches and Windows PCs. It can also stream directly from Spotify via Spotify Connect and is DLNA and UPnP compliant. 

The Audiolab 6000N Play network audio streamer is available from May in a choice of black or silver, at £449.95.

To learn more, click www.audiolab.co.uk

[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[PBJ Interconnect Cabling is Back]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=30989 2019-04-16T17:00:57Z 2019-04-16T16:38:50Z Kimber Kable is 40 years old this year. To mark the occasion, Russ Andrews is introducing a one-off, limited-edition version of Kimber’s PBJ analogue interconnect The strictly limited-edition cable includes the features of the original. It is also now available with upgraded WBT 0114 RCA phono connectors in place of the standard Kimber UltraPlate connectors. The original tri-wire braid is retained in red, blue and black. PBJ (the name derives from Peanut Butter & Jelly) was adopted by company boss, Ray Kimber, who hoped that the cable would become a staple interconnect with audiophiles as the food itself became a staple many years ago. The tri-wire braid is made up of three VariStrand copper conductors, each is individually insulated with fluorocarbon dielectric and then braided together, with the red wire used for the signal, the blue for the ground and the black as an additional ‘drain’ wire. PBJ is available direct from Russ Andrews for a limited period at a cost of £170 for a 1m pair. To learn more, click www.russandrews.com [Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Kimber Kable is 40 years old this year. To mark the occasion, Russ Andrews is introducing a one-off, limited-edition version of Kimber’s PBJ analogue interconnect

The strictly limited-edition cable includes the features of the original. It is also now available with upgraded WBT 0114 RCA phono connectors in place of the standard Kimber UltraPlate connectors. The original tri-wire braid is retained in red, blue and black.

PBJ Interconnect Cabling is Back

PBJ (the name derives from Peanut Butter & Jelly) was adopted by company boss, Ray Kimber, who hoped that the cable would become a staple interconnect with audiophiles as the food itself became a staple many years ago.

PBJ Interconnect Cabling is Back

The tri-wire braid is made up of three VariStrand copper conductors, each is individually insulated with fluorocarbon dielectric and then braided together, with the red wire used for the signal, the blue for the ground and the black as an additional ‘drain’ wire.

PBJ is available direct from Russ Andrews for a limited period at a cost of £170 for a 1m pair.

To learn more, click www.russandrews.com

[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Paul Rigby http://www.theaudiophileman.com <![CDATA[Alumine Three Speakers From Stenheim]]> https://theaudiophileman.com/?p=30974 2019-04-19T09:48:27Z 2019-04-16T15:10:22Z Made in Switzerland, the new Alumine Three floor standing speakers are offered with an array of driver units The new Alumine Three speakers are 3-way models with two 203mm woofers, one 233mm mid driver plus a 25mm tweeter. The cabinet is based upon aluminium and is constructed with three independent chambers: two are closed and one holds a laminar flow front port. A passive 3-way crossover is included. Offering a sensitivity of 93dB and spanning 1050 x 250 x 330mm they weigh 70kg (which includes the adjustable feet). Price for the pair is $39,950. To learn more, click www.stenheim.com plus www.onegoodear.ca or call 001 416 997 5589 [Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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Made in Switzerland, the new Alumine Three floor standing speakers are offered with an array of driver units

The new Alumine Three speakers are 3-way models with two 203mm woofers, one 233mm mid driver plus a 25mm tweeter. The cabinet is based upon aluminium and is constructed with three independent chambers: two are closed and one holds a laminar flow front port.

Alumine Three Speakers From Stenheim

A passive 3-way crossover is included. Offering a sensitivity of 93dB and spanning 1050 x 250 x 330mm they weigh 70kg (which includes the adjustable feet). Price for the pair is $39,950.

Alumine Three Speakers From Stenheim

To learn more, click www.stenheim.com plus www.onegoodear.ca or call 001 416 997 5589

[Don’t forget to check out my Facebook Group, The Audiophile Man: Hi-Fi & Music here: www.facebook.com/groups/theaudiophileman for exclusive postings, exclusive editorial and more!]

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